Nashville bomber identified by the police


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On the 25th of December, a recreational vehicle believed to be owned by Anthony Quinn Warner, 63, detonated around 6:30 am. The impact of the blast was huge, and was felt nine blocks away from the scene.

Aftermath of the explosion

At least eight people were injured, up to 41 businesses including an AT&T transmission facility that provides wireless service to the region was destroyed, and all flights were grounded.

“The explosion was significant, as you can see… The police department, its federal partners—the FBI and ATF (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives)—are conducting a large-scale investigation to this point,” said Don Aaron, Nashville police spokesman.

The mayor of Nashville, John Cooper, spoke at the same conference, and told the public that the “deliberate” bomb was intended to create chaos and fear in a “season of peace and hope.”

 

“But Nashvillians have proven time and time again that the spirit of our city cannot be broken,” he said after he signed a state of emergency and curfew order to be effected in the area.

The Nashville bomber’s motives remain a mystery to the police

The Nashville bomber, Anthony Quinn Warner, left no clues or digital footprints that explain his motives behind the bombing. A month before, he signed a document that transferred his home in a Nashville suburb to a California woman. Warner, a computer consultant, also told his boss that he was retiring. His actions prior to the bombing have led investigators to conclude that he had no plans to return alive.

His neighbor, Rick Laude, recalled a conversation he had with Warner a day before the bombing that he believed in hindsight sounded ominous. After asking how Warner’s elderly mother was doing, Laude said he casually asked him, “Is Santa going to bring you anything good for Christmas?”

Warner smiled and said, “Oh, yeah, Nashville and the world is never going to forget me.”